Thursday, 19 August 2010

Is Obama Muslim? Increasing numbers of Americans think so

Since 2008 there has been a noticeable increase in the number of Americans who say that Obama is Muslim. I note that this is what people are 'saying', especially from the Republican side. Part of me suspects that they probably know what religion Obama is but it is more 'PC' to call him Muslim then black. While I suspect others have been convinced otherwise as this issue is simply not going away and of course by those determined to sway opinion against Obama. All this comes at an interesting time with Obama's remarks regarding the 9/11 mosque site in NYC over the weekend, which in turn may further taint opinion against him of the issue of his religious beliefs. Note also those that would like to see the church keep out of politics, but members of congress should be religious. I would have liked to have seen a poll of what religious beliefs are acceptable for those members to have, but maybe that is being saved for later.



Peace.

Amplify’d from pewresearch.org

A substantial and growing number of Americans say that Barack Obama is a Muslim, while the proportion saying he is a Christian has declined. More than a year and a half into his presidency, a plurality of the public says they do not know what religion Obama follows.

The view that Obama is a Muslim is more widespread among his political opponents than among his backers.

The belief that Obama is a Muslim has increased most sharply among Republicans (up 14 points since 2009), especially conservative Republicans (up 16 points). But the number of independents who say Obama is a Muslim has also increased significantly (up eight points). There has been little change in the number of Democrats who say Obama is a Muslim, but fewer Democrats today say he is a Christian (down nine points since 2009).

he survey also finds about half of the public (52%) says that churches should keep out of politics, while 43% say churches and other houses of worship should express their views on social and political questions.
Despite the growing opposition to political involvement on the part of churches, most people continue to say they want political leaders who are religious. About six-in-ten (61%) agree that it is important that members of Congress have strong religious beliefs.Read more at pewresearch.org